About your Search

20110701
20110731
STATION
MSNBC 27
MSNBCW 20
CNNW 19
CNN 18
COM 16
KQED (PBS) 13
WRC (NBC) 12
WETA 8
CSPAN 7
CSPAN2 7
KNTV (NBC) 7
WHUT (Howard University Television) 7
WBAL (NBC) 6
WJZ (CBS) 6
WMPT (PBS) 6
KRCB (PBS) 5
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 214
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 214 (some duplicates have been removed)
time for rupert murdoch in london. >> there's 15 days until default day. >> a lot of hurdles between now and then. >> placing more blame on republicans. >> republicans are still playing games with the debt. >> my way or nothing. >> one-track mind, two-track plan. >> it's a charade. >> the real action will be behind the scenes. >> republicans are dealing in a dream world. >> wishing, rather, for a balanced budget make it happen? >> i'm not sure what planet they are living on. >> i found it irresponsible. >> the no tax man come et. >> they are terrified of grover norquist. >> the answer is no. no. >> and for once, republican presidential candidates have money problems. >> and big money, big problems? gop fundraisers staying on the sidelines. >> mitt romney, 70% maxed out contributions. >> gingrich's campaign is $1 million in debt. >> and the arrests continue as the british police close in on rupert murdoch's media empire scandal. >> every day we're seeing more inconceivable things happen. >> in the last 24 hours, two high-level resignations. >> head of scotland yard resigned yesterday.
continue as the british police close in on rupert murdoch's media empire scandal. >> every day we're seeing more inconceivable things happen. >> in the last 24 hours, two high-level resignations. >> head of scotland yard resigned yesterday. >> rebekah brooks was released on jail. >> rupert murdoch is said to face the scandal head-on tomorrow. >> now we move to david cameron. >> is cutting short a trip today to south africa. >> order. when are they going to do the decent thing and resign? >> congress now has 15 days to pass a bill to raise the debt ceiling before the united states government goes into a catastrophic default on august 2nd. today harry reid announced the senate will meet every day until the debt ceiling is raised. yesterday, david rogers of politico discovered and reported that house speaker john boehner and eric cantor held a secret meeting with barack obama at the white house. a republican leadership aide said "the lines of communication are being kept open, but there's nothing to report in terms of an agreement or progress." tomorrow the house republicans will hold a vote o
hours, rupert murdoch will face parliament. we're live in london. >> no break in the debt ceiling talks but the white house insists that backstage progress is being made to reach a deal before the august 2nd default deadline on this "american morning." >>> good morning to you. thank you for being with us. 6:00 a.m. in new york this morning. tuesday, july 19th. i was hearing that in parts of iowa the heat index felt like 130 yesterday. it's been brutal out there. >> even this morning on the east coast, it felt different. it felt hotter. we'll be covering that. >>> we're watching that and millions are watching with a worldwide media empire hanging in the balance rupert murdoch is just hours away from facing his defining moment. in less than four hours, murdoch, his son and former top newspaper executive will appear before the british parliament. >> they will be asked what they knew about this phone hacking scandal that's growing wider by the day. it's threatening to take down news corp and perhaps murdoch himself. >> and the question is what they are going to be called upon to explain, wh
week. >>> the headline-grabbing word scandal no longer captures what's happening to rupert murdoch's empire. targets as high as the prime minister and the queen and with one of his top lieutenants arrested in london today, this is a moment of reckoning for journalism. is there really any evidence of misconduct here in the u.s.? are murdoch's critics using this crisis as an excuse to vilify him. our guests include the editor of "the guardian." how much is the press being spun by the president and the republicans. i'm howard kurtz. this is "reliable sources." >>> the murdoch media empire is in all-out damage control mode as the scandal at the british papers continues to spread on this side of the atlantic, the fbi opened a preliminary investigation on whether phone hacking took place in the u.s. and the dizzies pace of developments has made headlines around the world. >> mps finally forced murdoch to withdraw his bskyb bid. his empire has cracked, but is it broken. >> following breaking news in london where the embattled chief executive of murdoch's newspaper has resigned. >> news in
rupert murdoch with tough questions later today, outraged over a string of allegations reporters for the paper hacked mobile phones to get scoops. murdoch's apologized. much more on the story justice ahead on "world business today." one of the first journal itss who exposed phone hacking by "news of the world" has been found dead. sean ward said andy coulson hacked into phones. police are not treating the death as suspicious. >>> a u.s. official says a meeting between the u.s. and libya at the weekend was meant to deliver one message, that moammar gadhafi must go. libya called the face-to-face talks in tunisia a first step. the u.s. says the meeting was a one-off event. >>> the women's world cup team soaked up the limelight after bringing japan its first cup title. japan's the first asian nation with a world cup championship. those are the headlines. auto' jane verjee at cnn in london. "world business today" starts now. >> a very good afternoon to you from cnn hong kong, i'm alicia tank. >> good morning from cnn london. you're watching "world business today." time to testify, new
. it's threatened and under attack. it's the empire of rupert murdoch, newspaper man who shut down one of his many papers but remains in the business along with some of the great name plates in film and television. the scandal that started with newspaper reporters eavesdropping on the cell phones of innocent people continues to claim new victims and may soon be felt more here in the u.s. than many first thought. it's still galloping its way through great britain where it is the story. tomorrow we get to hear from rupert murdoch. tonight there's another new development in this. we want to begin our reporting with nbc's stephanie gosk in london. stephanie, good evening. >> good evening, brian. every day since this scandal broke, there seems it be a new bombshell. revelations, resignations, arrests. the last 24 hours are no exception. it's left people in this country wondering and worried what will happen next. the fabled scotland yard is reeling after two sudden resignations of its most senior leadership. sir paul stephenson, the police chief, and his deputy, john yates, career policemen
, welcome to the program. i'm don lemon. our top story, a day of dramatic confrontation in the murdoch scandal. british lawmakers grilled rupert murdoch and his son james for hours and hearing televised all over the world. murdoch's media empire has been rocked by accusations of police payoffs, phone hacking and corruption at his british newspapers. and troughout the hearing, all of the charges kept coming back to one central question. take a listen. >> do you accept that ultimately, you are responsible for this whole fiasco? >> no. >> you are not responsible? who is responsible? >> the people that i trusted to run -- and then maybe the people they trusted. >> the murdochs did their best to distance themselves from the worst allegations, but the question still remains what exactly did they know? and what actions did they condone? one lawmaker thinks they know more than they let on. >> are you familiar with the term willful blindness? >> mr. sanders, would you care to elaborate? >> it is a term that came up in the enron scandal. willful blindness is a legal term. if there is knowledge t
to go. implts mr. murdoch, james, through all the civil actions, have been been paying glenn moore's legal fees, not you personally but your organization? >> as i said earlier from the question from mr. davis. >> no. let's keep it short. yes or no. it's a yes or no question. >> i don't know the current status of those. are we paying all of his legal fees? >> have you been paying legal fees during the course of the civil actions? >> i don't know the details of the civil actions, but i do know that certain legal fees were paid for him by the company, and i was as surprised and shocked to learn that as you are. >> can you understand that people might ask why a company might wish to pay the legal fees of a convicted felon who has been involved intimately in the destruction of your reputation, if it was not to buy your corporation's silence? >> no, it's not. i can understand that, and that's exactly why i asked the question. it's exactly when the allegations came out, are we doing this? is this what the company is doing? on legal advice, you know, and again i don't want to be legalistic
, including an attack on media mogul rupert murdoch by a prankster armed with a plate of shaving cream. good evening. i'm jeffrey brown. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the newshour tonight, we examine today's proceedings where the head of news corp said he was shocked, appalled and ashamed, but not responsible for the misdeeds. we talk to john burns of "the new york times" and david folkenflik of npr. >> brown: then, we ask nuclear regulatory commission chair gregory jaczko if u.s. reactors could withstand an earthquake like the one that devastated japan. >> ifill: from indonesia, ray suarez reports on the challenges and the troubles facing one of the world's largest democracies. >> it made tremendous strides politically and economically but still struggles with corruption. >> brown: kwame holman updates the budget battles as the house and senate offer dueling plans for reducing the deficit. >> ifill: and judy woodruff explores the deadline-driven deal cutting underway with political editor david chalian. >> brown: plus, in a season of tornadoes, floods and more, we get some poetic perspec
murdoch's business apierced before members of british parliament. the session last lead it hours and apologized but insisted they knew little or nothing about the illlegal phone hacking at the newspaper, news of the world. >> first of all i'd like to say as well how sorry i am and how sorry we are to particularly the victims of the illlegal voice mailing deceptions and their families. it's a matter of great regret of mine,y father and everyone at news corporation and these are standards these actionso nolive up to the standards that our company aspires to everywhere around the world. >> i would like to say this is the most humble day of my life. >> thank you. >> i became aware as it came out. th i was absolutely shocked, appalled and ashamed when i heard about the case only two weeks ago. >> charlie: here the end of the testimony rupert murdoch was asked if he considered resigning. >> have you considered resigning. >> no. >> why not? >> because i feel that people i trusted, not saying who. i don't know what level, they let me down and i think they behaved disgracefully and betray
>>> rupert murdoch says the phone hacking scandal is not ultimately his fault. this hour, the rivetting testimony about the broken trust, the shattered ethics and those who should pay for alleged crimes. stand by. hackers say they turned the tables on murdoch's company, tap into internal e-mail and other corporate secrets. they're threatening to go public with what they found. and president obama embraces a bipartisan compromise that could potentially, at least, be a way out of looming debt crisis. he's urging house republicans not to waste their time on a symbolic vote due to happen very soon. i'm woft blitzer here in "the situation room." >> rupert murdoch says this is the most humble day of his life. a titan of news business, he was called on the carpet before the british parliament today over the phone hacking scandal that shocked and afalled the world. along with a son and former chief executive, murdoch was hammered with questions about alleged crimes that brought down his popular tabloid, "the news of the world." >> we felt ashamed of what had happened and wanted t
). >> jon: do you think he died of natural causes or was it murdoch? (ominous music). (applause) well, i'm sure scotland yard's on this case like cream on a... >> right now police say the death is not considered suspicious. (laughter) >> jon: well, i guess the guys who were bribed don't think there's anything suspicious in the death of the guy who blew the whistle on the company providing the bribes, i'm satisfied. (laughter) of course, the whole business was prelude to today's main event. rupert murdoch and his son james appearing before parliament's committee on culture, media, sport, and vowel-shaped furniture. (laughter) confess before the u-shaped desk of contrition! don't make us bring in the e! (laughter) the whole day of testimony was amazing but perhaps no moment more remarkable than murdoch interrupting his son's opening statement. >> of the "news of the world" newspaper... >> before you get to that, i would just like to say one sentence. this is the most humble day of my life. (laughter). >> jon: not so humble you couldn't wait for your turn to talk! (cheers and applause) by
, you're a rupert murdoch customer. the murdochs both father and son have their work cut out for them. >> they have two different things in their testimony tomorrow. they got acknowledge responsibility. they have to say that what is completely obvious is that this wasn't abe ration, it was apparently thousands of people who were hacked and the idea they didn't know is propest rous. at the some time, they can't con fes to crimes. >> another twist a former news of the world reporter a man who blew the whistle has been found dead in his home. one of the first to go on the record saying that his colleagues were encouraged to hack. the death is being treated as unexplained but not suspicious. the hacker group hit the sun, a murdoch paper, it posted fake articles and now some hackers saying they're sitting on news of the world e-mails. >>> two weeks until america runs out of money to pay its bill. just under half of the americans have confidence that president obama will hado the right thing. they're lingering between 25 and 35%. you can see president obama at less than half. 45% is higher
outcry, but it has not lifted the spotlight from the murdoch empire which controls 40% of newspaper circulation in the u.k. and has worldwide reach. >> rupert murdoch, 1969, shortly after he bought a newspaper, "the news of the world," that was to become his very profitable pride and joy. >> 4 give the individual by all means, but you cannot forget. >> 42 years later, he might well have made the same remarks about the person at the paper became fairly rotten and whose action shocked the nation. the paper, which has been printed for 168 years, became indelibly linked with the worst practices in journalism. james murdoch concluded it could not be amended. >> clearly, practices of certain individuals did not live up to the standards and quality of journalism that we believe in and that i believe in. and that this company believes in. this company has been a great investor in journalism, a greater investor in media in general, and it is something that we believe very strongly and. clearly, certain activities did not live up to those standards. that is a matter of great regret for me per
, but it has not lifted the spotlight from the murdoch empire which controls 40% of newspaper circulation in the u.k. and has worldwide reach. >> rupert murdoch, 1969, shortly after he bought a newspaper, "the news of the world," that was to become his very profitable pride and joy. >> 4 give the individual by all means, but you cannot forget. >> 42 years later, he might well have made the same remarks about the person at the paper became fairly rotten and whose action shocked the nation. the paper, which has been printed for 168 years, became indelibly linked with the worst practices in journalism. james murdoch concluded it could not be amended. >> clearly, practices of certain individuals did not live up to the standards and quality of journalism that we believe in and that i believe in. and that this company believes in. this company has been a great investor in journalism, a greater investor in media in general, and it is something that we believe very strongly and. clearly, certain activities did not live up to those standards. that is a matter of great regret for me personally and
stories, this friday, july 8th. news corp boss rupert murdoch folds his tabloid. >>> shuttle "atlantis" files up for one final foray. >>> and harry potter fans unite for one last wave of the wand. >>> it's the end of the "news of the world." that shamed british sunday newspaper is shutting down. after this weekend's edition and 168 years of history, the last edition of the "news of the world" will have rolled off the printing presses. >> now, as outrage spread from the public to the politicians and finally to the advertisers, rupert murdoch took decisive action. his son, james, announced the paper would close after this coming weekend and that all the staff would be out of a job. james, of course, is the chairman of news international. he posted his statement online for all to see. the key line in that statement, the news of the world is in the business of holding others to account, but it failed when it came to itself. charles? >> it appears that failure could lead to the arrest of this man. former editor andy coorson. reporting suggest that he is supposed to turn himself over this mo
the rupert murdoch media scandal. what's next in this story. >>> and in the u.s., sweltering heat across much of the nation. tonight, how bad it will get and for how long? a huge percentage of this country. >>> looking for a connection between military who served in vietnam and increased risk in dementia. >>> america's team back home tonight. they remain our top women. it just wasn't their day. nightly news begins now. >>> good evening. it's one of the true media empires in the world. it's threatened and under attack. it's the empire of rupert murdoch, newspaper man who shut down one of his many papers but remains in the business along with some of the great name plates in the film business and in television. the scandal that started with newspaper reporters eavesdropping on the cell phones of innocent people continues to claim new victims and may soon be felt here in the u.s. than many first thought. it's still galluping its way through great britain, where it is the story. we get to hear from rupert murdoch. tonight there's been another development in this. we begin with stephanie gosk in l
yard resigns on the same day london police arrest a star of rupert murdoch's media empire. >>> the new mystery surrounding casey anthony. where is she after walking out of jail now a free woman? >>> and sudden death. an exhilarating women's world cup decided on the final kick. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good evening. the growing fallout from great britain's newspaper phone hacking scandal gained new momentum today, claiming two major figures. including scotland yard's top cop. tonight the woman who until recently ran rupert murdoch's newspaper holdings in the uk is under arrest. and the head of the london police department has abruptly resigned amid questions over his department's pursuit of the case. all this being followed very closely in this country, which is home to some of the crown jewels of murdoch's now damaged media empire. nbc's stephanie gosk is in london tonight with late developments for us in the case. stephanie, good evening. >> reporter: good evening, lester. well, the casualties in this story continue to pile up. rebekah brooks, one of rupert mu
you. louise mensch? >> i would like to draw you out with a question i put to mr. james murdoch at the end of our last session, which is the wider culture of hacking and private detectives within fleet street and to what extent the "news of the world" felt justified in those practices, because everybody is doing it, if you like. i put to him that piers morgan, now a celebrity anchor on cnn, said openly in his book which was published before this whole controversy broke, that he had hacked phones, he said he won scoop of the year for a story, he actually gave tutorial in how one accesses voicemail by punching in a code and clearly from the account that he gives, he did it routinely as editor of "the daily mirror" and it was something that happened there. he was also of course an ex-employee of "news of the world." i went through the information commissioners' report and added up, for transactions in the daily mail's associated newspapers group, there were 1,387 transactions with mr. whitmore used by 98 journalists in total across titles and supplements in that group. is it not ob
the scandal threatening rupert murdoch. >> can you believe this story? >> unbelievable. >> this story keeps growing. >> it's sort of engulfing different facets of the world. and you can't imagine that it wouldn't come to the united states. >> the guy shows up dead. jude law is now a part of this? in a serious angle that brings this scandal to the united states. >> first, rupert murdoch and his son are preparing to appear before parliament today. police are arresting 11 people since the hacking and bribery allegations emerged including the ceo rebecca brooks who heads to parliament today. uk police being questioned by parliament. they're under scrutiny for failure to investigate previous hacking incidents and alleged ties to executives in murdoch's companies. and "the new york times" reports that aides close to the murdoch family spent years and millions of dollars covering up wrongdoing at the now defunct "news of the world," the "times" cites interviews with hundreds of current and former employees say "the news of the world" paid police for information. and a twist to the story, a reporte
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 214 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (31 Dec 2014)